Tag Archives: Civil Code

China’s Civil Code to have a Contract Part Judicial Interpretation

photo of workshop

Because the Supreme People’s Court (SPC) has not released its judicial interpretation agenda for 2021 (as previously mentioned), the observer seeking to determine what is on that drafting priority list must rely on occasional reports in the professional and academic press.  Last month, several academic Wechat accounts reported on discussions of a draft of a judicial interpretation of the Contract Part of the Civil Code  民法典合同编司法解释(草案). The one I’m relying upon contains the more detailed report on the discussion, including the names of those discussing the draft on behalf of the SPC.  I’ll flag from this article why this discussion was held, what can be learned from the report on the discussion, and a quick preview of the interpretation itself.  But first, a few words about why this interpretation is needed and what it is intended to do.

Background on judicial interpretations

Through judicial interpretations, the SPC is seeking to “unify court judgments,”  to ensure that court decisions throughout the country and at various levels of courts are more consistent.  This principle is set out in the current and previous judicial reform plans. Establishing a Chinese case law system assists in this, but is insufficient.  As seen from the SPC, judicial interpretations are intended to address issues in which statutory law is either ambiguous or contains a gap, causing judges to misunderstand (the law) and issue decisions inconsistent with legislative intent (see more below).  The SPC  identifies those issues through the multiple stages in the judicial interpretation drafting process.

.Judges, particularly at the basic level, need to issue judgments efficiently in commercial cases. They face a combination of a large number of cases and relatively short deadlines in domestic civil procedure.  Recent reforms to the jurisdiction of the courts will require basic level courts to deal with even more cases.   They cannot assume that most cases will settle, as shown by my own research (concerning certain courts) and those of some others  (in certain courts) . The Contract Part of the Civil Code is not detailed enough for judges to rely upon to decide contract cases efficiently and consistently.  A more active National People’s Congress (NPC)  (and its Standing Committee) is not able to fill in the gap.  Therefore the SPC must be the one to do so.

As I have written before in this blog and in my recent book chapter, the SPC and the NPC, and NPC Standing Committee (NPCSC), most often the NPCSC Legislative Affairs Commission (LAC), communicate during the course of judicial interpretation drafting.  SPC rules require that a judicial interpretation draft be submitted to the relevant committees of the NPC or relevant department of the NPCSC to solicit their views before the final draft is submitted to the SPC judicial (adjudication) committee. Additional relevant guidance cited in my chapter reminds drafters that “liaison with the NPCSC LAC must be timely, and after major revisions to the judicial interpretation draft after consulting with the NPC LAC, the view of the NPCSC LAC  should be solicited again.”  Therefore the views of the two institutions are harmonized before the judicial interpretation is finalized by judicial committee approval.

Broad Consultation of Opinions

As I wrote in my recent book chapter, discussions of draft judicial interpretations by specialists are a regular part of the SPC’s judicial interpretation drafting process.  I described this as “broad consultation outside the gated community.”  The reason workshops are organized is to solicit the views of experts on specialized or technical subject matter. Those invited for these meetings tend to be senior academics, either from the country’s major universities or CASS, as was the case here.

The workshop was held at Renmin University, while a second similar workshop was held at CASS.  Participants included experts from the NPC LAC,  Renmin, Peking and Tsinghua Universities, China University of Political Science and Law,  China Academy of Social Sciences, Jilin University, Beijing Institute of Technology, Central University of Finance and Economics, University of International Business and Economics among others.

The normal practice is for SPC drafters to assess the views given by those experts at the workshops and consider whether they should be adopted or further taken into consideration. Professor Wang Liming, who is a member of the China International Commercial Court expert committee, was one of the leaders who spoke.

It can be determined from the workshop report which personnel at the SPC were involved in drafting and what the issues are.  As to personnel, Justice Liu Guixiang spoke at the beginning of the workshop, which means he is the most senior SPC judge responsible for the draft interpretation. Justice Liu is a full-time member of the judicial committee with vice-ministerial rank. Others from the SPC who spoke included Judge Guo Feng, deputy head of the Research Office,  Chen Longye, head of the civil section of the Research Office, Jiang Jiadi, a staff member of the same section, Judge Lin Wenxue, head of the #2 Civil Division (responsible for domestic commercial issues) and Judge Zeng Hongwei, a judge in the #2 Civil Division.  The #2 Civil Division hears appeals and retrials (再审) (and applications for retrial), unlike the Research Office, and therefore sees first hand some of the issues arising in the lower courts.  I surmise that Chen, Jiang and Zeng are the ones who are shouldering the bulk of the drafting work.  Judges Guo and Lin would have many other responsibilities.  The persons primarily involved in drafting discussed their parts of the interpretation.

Preview of the Interpretation

The first chapter of the draft interpretation is “General Provisions,” in which Chen Longye of the Research Office took the lead.  Judge Zeng Hongwei took the lead in discussing the second chapter on contract establishment. Issues included:

  •  contract interpretation;
  • trade practices;
  • application of non-contractual obligations;
  •  contract formation;
  • contract terms;
  • form of the contract; and
  • agency contracts,

Chapters 3 and 4 of the draft relate to the validity of and the performance of contract. Also, the #2 Civil Division took the lead in drafting because Judges Lin Wenxue and  Zeng Hongwei spoke.  From the discussion, it appears that the controversial questions were the oldies but goodies, the ones that occur in practice:

  • contract validity and  the obligation to report for approval;
  • defective contracts;
  • contracts in violation of mandatory provisions;
  • consequences of validity;
  • signing related issues, involving corporate seals and individual fingerprints;
  •  debtor’s right of defense in the transfer of creditor’s rights;
  • repayment of debts, debts by shares, joint debts, indivisible debts;
  • contract performance by a third party or to a third party or repayment by a third party;
  • Repayment by third parties; and
  • changes in circumstances.

Chapters 5 and 6 concern preservation of contract (保全), contract modification and transfer.  Judge Guo Feng and Jiang Jiadi of the  Research Office took the lead.  Issues included:

  • scope of rights,
  • scope of rights exclusive to the debtor
  •  right of subrogation
  • right of cancellation in “contract preservation;”
  • Contract modification and transfer;
  • role of a third party in the litigation of the creditor’s rights and debt transfer disputes,

Chapters 7 and 8 relate to  “Termination of Contract Rights and Obligations, Liability for Breach of Contract”.   Chen Longye took the lead in discussing the following issues, among others:

  • liability for compensation for contractual obligations after the breach;
  •  termination and its consequences;
  • the timing of termination;
  • determination of losses due to breach of contract;
  • liquidated damages, deposits, delay in receipt; and
  • force majeure.

When will the Interpretation be Issued?

As to whether this judicial interpretation will be issued by the end of this year, I personally have my doubts.  I have not found any reports of discussion of this draft in the lower courts or with the NPCSC LAC.  These steps are a usual part of judicial interpretation drafting.  Contract law is fundamental to business.  Those in SPC leadership are unlikely to approve this interpretation unless they think it meets the target of dealing with the unclear issues that lower courts and practitioners frequently encounter in practice.  The scope of consultation is unknown, such as whether some lawyers or companies will be consulted, or whether the entire draft will be issued for public comment. It is also unknown whether selected foreign contract law specialists have or will be approached for their comments.  We have to wait for further developments.

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Many thanks to certain anonymous readers for their insightful comments on earlier versions of this blogpost. They are not responsible for any errors or “erroneous views.”

Supreme People’s Court’s 2020 Accomplishments in Transitioning to the Civil Code

 

photo of a meeting of the SPC’s judicial committee. I surmise a screen for viewing presentations is not visible.

On 30 and 31 December 2020, the Supreme People’s Court (SPC) delivered  its first batches of documents designed to ensure a seamless transition to the Civil Code on 1 January 2021, about which I wrote last recently and in November, 2020. Several SPC leaders spoke at a press conference on the morning of 30 December 2020 to announce the issuance of these documents, with Justice He Rong taking the lead.  Justice He Rong also gave highlights of items on the SPC’s agenda on the transition to the Civil Code for 2021, but those details will be forthcoming in a subsequent blogpost.

I correctly predicted that the SPC judicial committee would meet one or more times before year-end and we readers of SPC media will see one or more long catalogues of cancelled and amended judicial interpretations and other judicial normative documents published on or before 1 January 2021.

We can  see the results of the long hours of work of unknown numbers of people, particularly within the SPC, the National People’s Congress Legislative Affairs Commission (NPC LAC), and  many “relevant departments” in drafting these judicial interpretations.  Justice He Rong mentioned the timely guidance of the (NPC LAC) (我们得到了全国人大常委会法工委的及时指导),  support and coordination from the Supreme People’s Procuratorate, and support and help from central state organs and academics and the public.  Timely guidance from the NPC LAC signals (as mentioned previously), that SPC staff spent unknown numbers of hours  ensuring that these judicial interpretations were properly harmonized. 

It is unclear to me whether those of us outside the system will ever learn about the amount of work involved. I surmise the responsibility of delivering this timely and properly  depended on the project management skills of the Research Office.  If foreigners could give recommendations to SPC leaders concerning “models of socialist labor (动模范),” I would recommend it to all involved in the transition to the Civil Code. 

Given the very general provisions of the Civil Code, these judicial interpretations (and more to come) are crucial for the operation of the Chinese legal system, despite theoretical questions about their binding nature beyond the court system.

As of 1 January 2021, the following judicial interpretations and other normative documents implementing the Civil Code have been issued (the English titles below are rough translations).  I will link to English translations as they become available. Unless otherwise noted, a document is a judicial interpretation. Among the many aspects of the drafting process, per the SPC’s relevant five year plan, socialist core values have been incorporated into the judicial interpretations.

The judicial interpretations 

Scattered comments are in italics. Where judicial interpretations have numbering , for example (1), it suggests that the drafters anticipate further comprehensive interpretations as the greater situation (大局) evolves:

  1. Decision on invalidating certain judicial interpretations and judicial normative documents (关于废止部分司法解释及相关规范性文件的决定). It canceled 116 of them, some of which I recall reviewing for my 1993 article;
  2. Regulations on timing application  of the Civil Code (

    关于适用《中华人民共和国民法典》时间效力的若干规定).  These rules relate to application of Civil Code for disputes etc. that arose pre-Civil Code. Although the general rule is that the then current law and judicial interpretations will be applied, for some types of cases  the Civil Code will be applied. (If it better protects a party’s rights and interests, upholds social and public order, and promotes socialist core values). Chart with explanation linked here.

  3. Interpretation on the application of the marriage and family part of the Civil Code (1) (最高人民法院关于适用《中华人民共和国民法典》婚姻家庭编的解释(一)). Note article 1 links ongoing domestic violence to the term “abuse” in the Civil Code. Chart with judicial interpretation, Civil Code, and prior judicial interpretation linked here
  4. Interpretation on the application of law to labor disputes (1) 最高人民法院关于审理劳动争议案件适用法律问题的解释(一).  

  5.  Interpretation on the application of law to construction contracts (1)(最高人民法院关于审理建设工程施工合同纠纷案件适用法律问题的解释(一));
  6. Interpretation on the application of law to the property (rights in rem) part of the Civil Code] (1) (最高人民法院关于适用《中华人民共和国民法典》物权编的解释(一)). Rules relate both to immovable (real) and movable property, and authority of both courts and arbitral institutions;
  7. Interpretation on the application of law to the inheritance part of the Civil Code (1) (最高人民法院关于适用《中华人民共和国民法典》继承编的解释(一)). Chart with judicial interpretation, Civil Code, and prior judicial interpretation linked here
  8. Interpretation regarding the system of taking security) ( 关于适用
    《中华人民共和国民法典》有关担保制度的解释). This is a comprehensive interpretation on secured interests (besides mortgages, guarantees, liens, pledges, it also has content concerning factoring, finance leasing, and retention of title, as well as the giving of security by companies. It specifies that independent (demand) guarantees continue to be governed by the 2016 judicial interpretation on that topic. Those latter regulations are crucial to BRI infrastructure projects, as mentioned in this blogpost.
  9. Decision on amending the interpretation on the application of the Trade Union Law and 27 other civil law related judicial interpretations  related to civil-related judicial work (关于修改《最高人民法院关于在民事审判工作中适用〈中华人民共和国工会法〉若干问题的解释》等二十七件民事类司法解释的决定);
  10. Decision on amending the judicial interpretation on the hearing of patent tort disputes and 18 other intellectual property-related judicial interpretations (关于修改《最高人民法院关于审理侵犯专利权纠纷案件应用法律若干问题的解释(二)》等十八件知识产权类司法解释的决定);
  11. Decision on amending the “SPC Provisions on some issues concerning people’s courts seizing goods being shipped by rail” and 18 other enforcement-type judicial interpretations (关于修改
    《最高人民法院关于人民法院扣押铁路运输货物若干问题的规定》等十八件执行类司法解释的决定)。 Comparison chart linked here;
  12. Decision on amending the “Official Reply of the Supreme People’s Court on Whether the Right to Use of Allotted State-Owned Land of a Bankrupt Enterprise Shall Be Classified as Insolvent Property” and 29 other commercial-type judicial interpretations (最高人民法院关于修改《最高人民法院关于破产企业国有划拨土地使用权应否列入破产财产等问题的批复》等二十九件商事类司法解释的决定)
  13. Decision on amending the “Provisions of the Supreme People’s Court about Several Issues Concerning the Civil Mediation Work of the People’s Courts” and 19 other civil procedure-related judicial interpretations (最高人民法院关于修改《最高人民法院关于人民法院民事调解工作若干问题的规定》等十九件民事诉讼类司法解释的决定);
  14. Notice that certain guiding cases are not to be further used for reference (最高人民法院关于部分指导性案例不再参照的通知). This is a judicial normative document, not a judicial interpretation.
  15. SPC issues amended “regulations on civil causes of action” (最高人民法院印发修改后的《民事案件案由规定》).  This is a judicial normative document, not a judicial interpretation. This link contains both the decision itself to amend the causes of action and the amended causes of action. Compensation for sexual harassment is listed (#372), but detailed provisions on the elements have not yet been issued.

As for the review of local level judicial guidance documents for consistency with the Civil Code, mentioned in the November blogpost, the Shanghai Higher People’s Court has reported that it has met its performance goal.  Another blogpost will discuss new SPC guidance(that I  flagged a year and a half ago, in the current judicial reform program) directed towards reining in local court guidance, or as seen another way, strengthening the SPC’s firm guiding hand!

Civil Code & Supreme People’s Court update

Merry Christmas to all blog readers who celebrate!

The Supreme People’s Court media outlets posted a brief article on 23 December updating the court system and legal professionals on progress towards seamless transition to the Civil Code on 1 January, about which I wrote last month, by reporting on a . From that notice, it appears that the staff of the SPC’s Research Office (which coordinates judicial interpretations and is in charge of guiding cases) and other staff members of the SPC’s Leading Small Group for Implementing Civil Code Work 民法典贯彻实施工作领导小组 (Leading Small Group) will have long nights of work until the end of the year.

The notice reported on a recent meeting chaired by Justice He Rong. She is the executive vice president (and deputy Party Secretary of the SPC) and led a meeting of the entire Leading Small Group and the SPC’s judicial committee to review the work of the committee.The decision was to “approve in principle” decisions concerning canceling and amending 591 judicial interpretations and related judicial normative documents (judicial documents) and 139 guiding cases. “Approval in principle” (原则通过), as discussed here, is not mentioned by the SPC’s 2007 regulations on judicial interpretations but is one of the SPC’s long-established practices. It means that the judicial committee has approved it, subject to some “minor” amendments. Minor amendments are more than typographical errors and relate to specific substantive matters.

Justice He reminded meeting participants that the smooth transition to the Civil Code was highly valued by General Secretary Xi Jinping, so that it was part of the SPC’s political responsibility to complete the work properly and timely.   But the focus of this blogpost is again on the practicalities, rather than the political aspects of this project.

Although it was said to be Justice He’s guidance, I surmise that it was the drafters’ thinking to  take this comprehensive cleanup as an opportunity to focus on making the Civil Code easy for users to apply, and strive to build a clear, concise, and highly targeted judicial interpretation system. I read from the language of this notice that the drafters plan to issue more comprehensive judicial interpretations on broad areas of law (such as the one on taking security that is has been issued for comment) rather than ones relating to specific questions of law. 

The judicial committee decided to cancel 116 judicial interpretations and other judicial documents, and approved in principle amendments to 14 other general judicial interpretations and other judicial documents, and another 111 judicial interpretations and judicial documents in the areas of:

  1. civil law (27),
  2. commercial law (29);
  3. intellectual property law (18);
  4. civil procedure law (19); and 
  5. enforcement procedures (18).

So it seems likely the SPC judicial committee will meet one or more times before year end and we readers of SPC media will see one or more long catalogue of cancelled and amended judicial interpretations and other judicial normative documents published on or before 1 January 2021. I hope the hard work of the team involved over many months is properly acknowledged.

Civil Code & the Supreme People’s Court

 
The new Chinese Civil Code will become effective on 1 January 2021, with broad impacts on Chinese law in and out of China.  As mentioned by most of the better law firms commenting on the Civil Code, the Supreme People’s Court (SPC) will fill in some of the broad principles through judicial interpretations.  Other regulatory ministries will do so for specific issues, such as land and property mortgages.  But the Civil Code involves a great deal of work behind the scenes at the SPC, so that 1 January 2021 sees a seamless transition from the separate bodies of Contract Law, Inheritance Law, etc. to the Civil Code and inconsistent judicial interpretations are no longer in effect.  A recent article in one of the SPC’s media outlets by the group in charge of the work gives more detail to the work that I flagged this in May, when I gave comments on the SPC’s major research topics on Chinalawtranslate.com::

the SPC will support the Civil Code by issuing transitional arrangements & judicial interpretations. Over the years, the SPC has been issuing judicial interpretations and other documents relating to the areas of law that will form the Civil Code, particularly in the area of personality rights (Portraiture, Personal Information, Privacy, Genetic Information rights etc.), areas where legislation has been lacking. So work will be needed to review the previous documents in a big “housecleaning exercise”. The articles [in the Civil Code] on personal information, privacy, etc. are not very detailed, although they are important to individual people. Then the question is here, what protections will be provided by forthcoming judicial interpretation(s). This will fill in some of the abstract statements in the Civil Code.

The article by the Leading Small Group Office reveals the following:

  1. Civil Code work is high priority as it is work that designated by the Party Center (literally, 党中央决策部署在人民法院得到不折不扣贯彻落实).  General Secretary Xi Jinping has pointed out that related judicial interpretations need to be improved timely, so the Civil Code, related legal provisions and the spirit are consistent ( 要及时完善相关民事司法解释,使之同民法典及有关法律规定和精神保持一致). But the focus in this post is not on the politics, but the practicalities of implementing the Civil Code in China). 
  2. The SPC has created a leading small group to lead an institution-wide team, entitled the Leading Small Group for Implementing Civil Code Work  民法典贯彻实施工作领导小组 (Leading Small Group).  SPC President Zhou Qiang heads the Leading Small Group. I’ve not yet identified who is heading the Leading Small Group’s Office (最高人民法院民法典贯彻实施工作领导小组办公室).
  3. The Leading Small Group Office [presumably] assembled a Task Breakdown Table( “切实实施民法典”任务分解表”).  The work involved includes: reviewing 591 related judicial interpretations and 139  guiding cases as well as SPC Gazette cases. It seems to involve significant project management skills.  At the SPC level, the Leading Small Group’s Office worked with the judicial interpretation department (the Research Office, as far as I know) and assigned responsibilities by the the principle:  “whoever drafted is responsible”.  That means that the #1 Civil Division would have reviewed interpretations related to family law issues (marriage and inheritance law, for example), and the #2 Civil Division would have reviewed company law and other related issues for which it is responsible.  According to the article, this review work was basically completed by the end of September. 
  4. The criteria for review are as follows: if the content of an old judicial interpretation has been completely adopted by the Civil Code, then the judicial interpretation will be abolished when the Civil Code becomes effective. If a current judicial interpretation completely conflicts with the Civil Code, the current one will be scheduled to be abolished. Another scenario is that the Civil Code and the current judicial interpretation are inconsistent, but it is worth amending it.  A last category is where the Civil Code has new provisions for which the SPC lacks related judicial interpretations. That goes on the SPC’s “to-do” list. For the many people interested in Chinese civil law, please be aware that the Leading Small Group Office has published a related set of books 《中华人民共和国民法典理解与适用》(全6卷11册)
  5. The article does not further mention the review of guiding cases and SPC Gazette cases, but presumably the same process applies to guiding cases and SPC Gazette cases. As the SPC’s Research Office is responsible for guiding cases, I expect that a careful review of existing cases was the responsibility of that office.
  6. The next step is to consolidate the long list of judicial interpretations that have been affected and the recommended solution in a list and accompanying report for eventual review and approval by the SPC’s judicial committee .  I would expect that there is a separate list for guiding cases that need to be abolished.  I would expect that the list of cases that may need to be abolished would also require an accompanying report.  
  7. As I have written on this blog previously, local courts issue local court guidance under different titles. In a blogpost last year, I mentioned that the SPC  has/will require local courts to report guiding rules applicable within their jurisdictions to the SPC. Part of the  work of the SPC in preparing for the Civil Code is to guide and supervise local courts to carry out a similar exercise to the SPC and report the results to the SPC.  Presumably some number of persons in the Leading Small Group Office are responsible for monitoring and coordinating with local higher people’s courts.  It is likely that the local courts are also discussing issues with their counterparts at the SPC. We should expect each local high court (and intermediate courts, such as Shenzhen) that issue local court guidance to issue lists of local court guidance that will be abolished or amended as of 1 January, to ensure a uniform approach by the Chinese courts as of 1 January.
  8. On the agenda for 2021 is amending the approved causes of action (案由) to be consistent with Civil Code, as the Civil Code will provide for new types of civil actions.  The SPC has designated persons to work on this (presumably on the “whoever is responsible principle”) and the plan is for work on drafting new causes of action to be completed by the end of 2021. 
  9. Another issue is transitional arrangements and retroactivity, that is, what law should be applied for cases that arose before the Civil Code was effective or were already in the court system when the Civil Code becomes effective. These are “universal” issues, not confined to China ( a quick search turned up relevant articles from the United States, Germany, England and Wales, among others).   The SPC undertook surveys within the court system on these issues and held three internal workshops in Guangdong to solicit views of local judges, particularly on commercial law-related issues. 
  10. An initial draft of the first judicial interpretation of the Civil Code (part 1) is in place, with the provisional title of “Supreme People’s Court Interpretation Concerning the Some Questions on the Application of the Civil Code of the People’s Republic of China (1) 《最高人民法院关于适用〈中华人民共和国民法典〉若干问题的解释(一)] 》”.  It will be sent to “relevant departments” to solicit their views. The relevant departments are not listed, but there would be many of them, including the Ministry of Land and Resources, Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development, and Ministry of Civil Affairs. Soliciting the views of the general public is not mentioned. 
  11. As for specialized judicial interpretations on critical issues such as property, contract, personality rights, family law issues, inheritance, and tort law (including sexual harassment, presumably), those are already “cooking” on the SPC’s judicial interpretation “stove.”  That is, the divisions of the SPC responsible are researching and drafting related issues, so that soon after the Civil Code becomes effective, old judicial interpretations are amended and new ones are issued. The divisions are taking the following three approaches–codifying prior judicial interpretations concerning a particular issue or issues, so that there is a single relevant judicial interpretation. The lower courts and the Chinese legal profession (and foreign parties as well) would find this approach helpful, as the relevant legal principle would be clearer.   A second approach would be to amend an existing judicial interpretation. The SPC plans to do this for certain interpretations, to provide timely guidance to the lower courts, to better ensure uniformity of court decisions. Third, for new areas of law, such as personality rights, relevant judicial interpretations will be issued “at an appropriate time.” 
  12. We can expect the SPC to further guide the lower courts (and the legal profession) on personality rights issues through “typical cases” and guiding cases or guidance cases issued by divisions of the SPC, before the SPC issues a related comprehensive judicial interpretation.
  13. The SPC is also working on improving its punitive damages system in intellectual property rights cases and when the timing is right, will work on a judicial interpretation. 
  14. On environmental and natural resource issues, the SPC is working on a judicial policy document, which is expected to be issued before year end. I surmise it is one of the major tasks of the SPC’s Environmental and Natural Resources Division. 
  15. The SPC will adjust its quality assessment standards for civil cases, and is working on related measures (研究制定评估考核办法文件),which will involve increasing use of professional judges meetings and judicial committee meetings as a way of ensuring uniformity of court decisions.
  16. The SPC’s guidance will promote diversified dispute resolution, (linked to the Fengqiao experience), which will have different implications in commercial areas of law than family law.  
  17. The SPC is still working on its judicial interpretation involving civil/criminal cross-over cases and has done several rounds of consultations with the “relevant departments,” presumably including the Ministry of Public Security and Supreme People’s Procuratorate.  This is a long-standing issue and difficult one.  This issue has been repeatedly raised by private entrepreneurs and their lawyers, among others. This issue is also “universal,” not confined to China.
  18. Other matters for the SPC include ongoing and future training, publicity, research, and publication concerning the Civil Code. The training is already ongoing within the SPC and lower courts on the Civil Code. The SPC is holding a series of training sessions conducted by experts.  Additionally, the SPC is also tasked with issuing Civil Code-related publicity aimed at the general public.  The SPC’s professional publications will do their part and publish Civil Code related articles research and practice oriented articles.  Although it isn’t specifically stated, I surmise that it is likely that next year’s SPC research agenda will include Civil Code related issues.
  19. I hope that the Leading Small Group Office takes heed of the recently published comments of retired SPC Judge Cai Xiaoxue:  when formulating judicial interpretations, various opinions should be humbly listened to in order to avoid errors or infeasibility of rules to the greatest extent. In the implementation of judicial interpretation, only by frequent self-examination and listening to different voices can errors be discovered and corrected, and fairness and justice can be maintained to the utmost extent (“在制定司法解释时,应当虚心听取各种不同意见,才能最大限度地避免规则错误或者不可行。在司法解释施行过程中,只有常常自省,注意倾听不同声音,才能发现错误,纠正错误,才能最大限度地维护公平正义”。).

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